The Victory (Morland Dynasty 12): by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

More Napoleonic Era! I thought of grouping at least four of these together, but it simply covers too much personal history in the lives of the Morland family characters. This book really piggybacks onto the one before it, ‘The Emperor’ and much is the same. Unfortunately for Lucy’s marriage to … Continue reading

The Emperor (Morland Dynasty 11): by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

The year is 1705 and Napoleon is in full force, charging here and there across Europe with that monstrous combination of arrogance and skill that the man displayed. As a result of the Napoleonic Wars, both England and France are in upheaval as one might well imagine, and the Morland … Continue reading

The Tangled Thread (Morland Dynasty 10): by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

The story moves to France for the duration of the French Revolution, a bloody and terrible time in France’s history. We became acquainted with Henri in the last book, a hopeless womanizer who at last meets the love of his life but lost her before her realized it. His daughter, … Continue reading

The Flood Tide (Morland Dynasty 9): by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

Possibly not a great spot to begin reviewing in the middle of these books, but I may get a chance to recap the first eight, and I will definitely still be reading them going forward so- shrug. If you want, stop now and get the first book “The Founding”. These … Continue reading

And the Mountains Echoed: by Khaled Hosseini

People who were a little too squeamish to read ‘The Kite Runner’ but heard the hubbub, or were not as crazy about ‘A Thousand Splendid Suns’, rejoice. Hosseini’s newest novel ‘And the Mountains Echoed’ is a stirring, uplifting book; and not in the way that your soul is wracked with grief and the only thing left for you to do is tell people it was inspiring.
What I like best about Hosseini’s writings is two part. First he teaches me about Afghan history and culture in a way that humanizes the people. Continue reading

Charlotte and Emily: A novel of the Brontes by Jude Morgan

Amazing amazing amazing. Those are my choice of words to describe the creative level of writing displayed by Jude Morgan here. I recently finished a certain book covered in another post that had won an award for being gloomy, I didn’t see the appeal. Charlotte and Emily was the kind of book I think should have awards. Why is there no gold star on this book? How come Oprah doesn’t want people to read it? Not violent enough, not immoral enough, not enough social issues. Bullcrap I cry. This is the sort of novel that should receive acclaim, for the simple virtue of the level of skill and talent in bringing writing to life.
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The Help: by Kathryn Stockett

Slavery was outlawed in 1863 freeing several million people to have the right to choose their own path in life. Sadly though it’s no news that racial prejudices still exist. When I was growing up in the 80s and 90s I somewhat mistakenly thought that racism was extinct, not having much exposure up in Washington state. Life in the South however has been quite different and still is in many areas today. It has it’s own unique history from that moment the Civil War ended. The author herself was raised in Jackson, Mississippi in the 1960s which gave her a unique perspective. Many white children were nannied by black women who cradled them, sang to them, dressed them, watched over them; and yet had a much lower status as a person. This book examines the relationship between the employer and employed, between the maids and the children.

Slavery was outlawed in 1863 freeing several million people to have the right to choose their own path in life. Sadly though it’s no news that racial prejudices still exist. When I was growing up in the 80s and 90s I somewhat mistakenly thought that racism was extinct, not having much exposure up in Washington state. Life in the South however has been quite different and still is in many areas today. Continue reading

Catching Fire: by Suzanne Collins

Katniss and Peeta have won their lives, but at what cost? Katniss finds herself facing this very question from the moment book two of The Hunger Games series picks up, as she and Peeta head home to District 12. They are victors, heroes, celebrities, but Katniss does not feel relief, far from it. If it were up to her, she would try to forget the Games entirely and never speak of them, and no wonder, but the Capitol as the book says, has a way of keeping the horror fresh and immediate. Continue reading