Grace: by Grace Coddington

I’m sorry to say I only first heard of Grace Coddington while watching ‘The September Issue’, the fast-paced 2009 documentary behind Vogue magazine’s annual September issue- the biggest of the year. Who was this lady stomping about the place, red frizzy hair flying, growling at Anna (quelle horreur!!) who was … Continue reading

A Thousand Miles To Freedom: My Escape From North Korea: by Eunsun Kim

Eunsun Kim had a relatively happy childhood. As naive to the problems experienced by her country and her family as only small children can be, Kim enjoyed the small holidays designed to further the cult of the leader of North Korea Kim Jong-il and fully believed that her country was … Continue reading

A Story Lately Told: by Anjelica Huston

A Story Lately Told lightly chronicles the actress Anjelica Huston’s early childhood years in Ireland, Europe, and America. During the 1950s and 60s her famous director father John Huston, and her mother Ricki moved in the highest circles of film society rubbing shoulders with everyone from Hemingway to Marilyn Monroe. … Continue reading

Stolen Lives: Twenty Years in a Desert Jail by Malika Oufkir with Michele Fitoussi

April 22nd 1987 while the rest of the world was going about its business, four siblings stumbled through the streets of Tangier, Morrocco looking for anyone, anyone at all to help them. Barefoot and starving they searched everywhere for succor. Strangers, former friends, even relatives turned them away. They had just escaped fifteen years of confinement, torture so deeply scarring mentally, emotionally and physically they could never recover.

April 22nd 1987 while the rest of the world was going about its business, four siblings stumbled through the streets of Tangier, Morrocco looking for anyone, anyone at all to help them. Barefoot and starving they searched everywhere for succor. Strangers, former friends, even relatives turned them away. They had just escaped fifteen years of confinement, torture so deeply scarring mentally, emotionally and physically they could never recover. Abdellatif, the youngest was 18. He had been incarcerated since he was three years old. Maria, one of the sisters weighed barely 66 pounds. Malika, the narrator and her siblings had dug for years with spoons, hiding the dirt at night like in some kind of Hollywood movie. Yet this was their life. What had they done to deserve this imprisonment and animalistic treatment? Nothing at all. Continue reading